Why we need to keep drinking our own milk

The idea that milk is good for the environment is no longer just a myth.

As part of the “milk for the future” initiative, a group of global scientists, including one of the world’s leading milk experts, are launching a campaign to convince the public to drink milk at least once a week.

“I would like to make the case that it’s very possible to do something really significant,” says Dr Sarah Smith, an expert in the science of milk and milk products at Imperial College London.

“We need to take this up, and do it.

We need to make it a part of our everyday life.”

Milk in a bottle The campaign’s website encourages people to start drinking milk in their own cups, and the campaign’s founders say that by having milk on tap for less than one and a half litres (two litres, or about half a pint) a day, they can save around 10,000 litres of water a year.

A glass of milk contains around 8 calories, compared with just 1-2 calories in a glass of juice, the authors of the report said.

“Milk’s been around for quite a while, so we can make a difference.” “

To help them get started, the campaign will include a number of posters across the UK. “

Milk’s been around for quite a while, so we can make a difference.”

To help them get started, the campaign will include a number of posters across the UK.

They will include images of people holding milk containers, and offer a link to an app where people can find milk from a local supplier.

In the US, the “Milks in the Tank” campaign has also started, with milk available to buy in convenience stores.

But while the idea of milk for the whole family is a new one, there is precedent for drinking milk for your own consumption in the past.

In 2014, a survey of more than 500 US adults found that more than half of people said they’d occasionally drink milk for personal reasons.

Around half of those people reported that it was the least healthy option, and more than 40 per cent said they drank it regularly.

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that women who drank three or more glasses of milk a day had a 50 per cent lower risk of breast cancer than those who drank no milk at all.

“It’s not necessarily the right thing to do, but it’s a small cost to pay to protect the environment,” says Smith.

“The good news is we’re not going to have to make that choice any time soon.”